B i o g r a p h y

Nicholas Schleyer is a versatile and experienced trumpeter and educator based in the Greater Boston and Providence, RI region.

 
Nick is a student at the Longy School of Music of Bard College. He is working toward earning a Master of Music in Trumpet Performance. He studies with Andy Kozar and Ashley Hall

As an educator, he has been working as a Brass and Marching Arts Instructor with marching bands, including the US Bands National Champion Blackstone Millville Chargers Marching Band (of which he is an alum), New England Regional Champion Cranston East Thunderbolt Marching Band, and the Westerly, Cumberland, and Narragansett marching bands. He is on faculty with the online teaching platform Maestro Music Professionals and the URI Summer Music Academy. In the summer of 2017 he had the opportunity to travel to Jamaica with the Jamaica Field Service Project of SUNY Fredonia to teach general music classes in elementary schools.

As a performer, he is a member of the American Band of Providence, Rhode Island under the direction of Brian Cardany. He has also been a member of the Warwick Symphony Orchestra and Metropolitan Wind Symphony. At the University of Rhode Island he was a soloist with the URI Symphonic Wind Ensemble and was principal trumpet and guest conductor of the URI Symphony Orchestra. He also performed in the Brass Quintet and Trumpet Ensemble.

 

He completed a degree in Trumpet Performance and Music Education at the University of Rhode Island. There, he studied trumpet with David Wharton. He has also studied with George Kent, Bob Izzo, Nicholas Marcotte, and Ronald Pouliot. He studied piano with Manabu Takasawa, Rebecca McCourt, and Paula Ryan.

Teaching Philosophy:

I teach music because it is a fundamental part of being human. My goal is to draw out the music that is already within my students. I have a deep rooted belief in the potential of everyone to succeed. All students should have the opportunity to create and perform music. In creating and performing music, students should have a historical, cultural, and analytical understanding of a diverse repertoire of music. As a New Music Equity Action signatory, I am committed to providing students with a diverse program of study, with at least 25% of materials being created by underrepresented minorities, including females, non-binary, LGTBQ+, and BIPOC. Music is a competitive field, and music education for students should have a competitive edge, within the classroom and outside the classroom. The classroom should be a safe and supportive environment where all students have the opportunity to grow and learn from each other. In music, students learn necessary life skills: teamwork, communication, discipline, humility, courtesy, problem-solving, critical thinking, resilience, and leadership. For the student, music is fundamental to their growth in becoming a member of society. 

Nick Schleyer